Thoughts On The Dead

Musings on the Most Ridiculous Band I Can't Stop Listening To

Bad Gag By The Bay

If you have the money for the Winterland ’73 box set, then go buy it; if you don’t have the money, then steal it from the torrent sites. Just listen to it: whatever it is you do with the rest of your week, listen to this kaiju destroy San Francisco in a way that AIDS could only dream of.

DUDE, WHAT THE FUCK?

NOT OK. Not ok at ALL, motherfucker.

 

5 Comments

  1. Ah, memories … 11/9/73 was my third Dead concert and my first of an eventual 12 at Winterland. I was in the Stanford Band and the next morning we had to assemble at around 5 am to go to the airport to fly to LA for the football game against USC. At some point during our “breakfast of champions” (beer & doughnuts – no lie), I turned to the guy next to me and said, “Wow, I’m still high from last night.” He responded, “Yeah, me too.”

    And such was college life in the early ’70s. Those were great Dead shows; I’m just sorry I could only go to one of them. I’m glad to have them in my iTunes library now.

    • Stevie B checking in!

      Love to hear the first-person reflections. In fact, I’ve been meaning to ask a (not-so-simple ) question: What did the Wall sound like in person? Was it noticeably different than anything you’d heard up ’til that point? Has sound tech caught up to what the Dead were doing back in the day, or does the WOS still stand out?

  2. Because the WOS was made up of about a million small speakers, it enabled the Dead to fill an arena with sound without it seeming too loud or distorted, and that did make for a very clean sound. And it was pretty impressive visually, too.

    But the degree of difference wasn’t so great that I really missed the WOS when they went back to a conventional system in ’76. People with more refined ears than mine might disagree on this point.

    I think the technology of today probably has more than caught up. The thing I notice is that everything is too damn loud now (and too much bass!). I have to wear musician’s earplugs to any live music event now just to bring the sound level down to a reasonable level.

    I don’t think the sound equipment of 40 years ago was capable of sustaining today’s volume levels without sounding pretty distorted. But just because you can turn it up to 11 doesn’t mean you should.

  3. With a bazillion watts of Mackintosh 3000 amps, it sounded pretty good, for the times. It was more amazing to look at rather than listen to. It would make your hair waft at high volumes. “Sound” being what it is: Pressure moving air.

  4. McIntosh spelling correction: With a bazillion watts of McIntosh 3000 amps, it sounded pretty good, for the times. It was more amazing to look at rather than listen to. It would make your hair waft at high volumes. “Sound” being what it is: Pressure moving air.

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