Thoughts On The Dead

Musings on the Most Ridiculous Band I Can't Stop Listening To

Nothing’s Shaking On 52nd Street

You know I have neither the patience nor stomach for any sort of Chuck Klosterman-like grand pronouncement on Billy Joel, whether of the traditionalist (PUSSY!) view, or the revisionist (GENIUS!) view.

He wrote some great songs, a bunch of good ones, and a whole lot of shit: the usual ratios. This is one of the good ones, and I would advise headphones; the production is better than I remember it being, with Billy’s piano and Liberty Devito’s drums pushed up front and doing most of the heavy lifting.

There is also a saxophone solo, because when Billy Joel signed his deal with the devil, that was one of the clauses.

7 Comments

  1. Not really in the Billy Joel camp. In the late 60s, he was in a British Invasion group (Echoes), a psychedelic-sort-of group (The Hassles), and an organ-drums duo, Lee Michaels-style (Attila). I haven’t heard Attila. I love Lee Michaels, as it happens, but he may be one of a kind (Teegarden and Van Winkle didn’t do it for me).

    Grateful Dead connection is distant: around 1965, Joel’s manager was Michael Lang, who was Marshall Bretetz’s partner and financier at Thee Image. Lang produced various Miami Pop Festivals, and Woodstock.

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